Meet Kyla Terenzek, recipient of the UBC Undergraduate Prize in Library Research

About the prize

The UBC Undergraduate Prize in Library Research is a way to showcase students’ effective and innovative use of library services, information experts and resources provided by the UBC Library. Applications for these prizes also provide students with an opportunity to reflect on their information-seeking experience, showcase their research beyond the classroom, and promote scholarship excellence at the undergraduate level at the University of British Columbia.

The Prize was established by UBC Library to encourage more and deeper use of its resources and collections, to advance information literacy at UBC, and to promote academic excellence at UBC.


Q: Could you tell us a little bit about your project?

This project was inspired by my wonderful experience in BIOL 342 where I was encouraged to study blue mussels for a class project. I immediately felt very connected to the group of species since I live on an island where a massive number of mussels died during the heat dome of 2021. After the heat dome, I noticed that there appeared to be a difference in the numbers of mussels that were lost around the islands where I completed the study based on how much direct sun they received when the tide was out during the heat dome. More bare patches occurred where mussels had once occupied the rocks on south- and west-facing beaches and rocks compared to east and north. Given that three closely related species of marine mussels are found on BC’s coast, two of which are known to be invasive and have higher heat tolerance than the indigenous mussel species, I wondered if there would be more surviving heat tolerant non-indigenous mussels on rocks and beaches that faced south and west. I also wondered if this was the case, if the new mussels that recruited to the south and west facing rocks and beaches would be more likely to be invasive since mussels can be more likely to settle near adults of their own species.

The results of my study surprisingly showed that all the mussels on the islands were indigenous but also found significant differences in shell size based on the cardinal direction the beach and rocks faced, and a significant difference in mantle pigment colour based on the amount of seaweed canopy coverage over mussel beds in the islands. Both mantle pigment and shell shape have been related to selection pressure, which could be interesting for future investigations.

Q: What does winning this prize mean to you?

“This reaffirms the immense value in connecting with UBC Library and its incredible resources and staff, faculty and mentors at UBC.”

I am extremely grateful and honored for this award and experience. This reaffirms the immense value in connecting with UBC Library and their incredible resources and staff, faculty and mentors at UBC. I am beyond grateful for the knowledge and support of my supervisor for this project, Professor Celeste Leander. I could have never imagined having such an amazing and inspiring research opportunity in my undergrad.

Q: What are your plans for the future?

I’ve come to love the strange and wonderful world of mussel biology through this project and hope to continue to study blue mussels after my undergrad and continue to work to help tell their story. Because of the complex life histories of invertebrates, it can be difficult to understand how organisms such as blue mussels may respond to climate change over time, so participating in continued monitoring and research would be a rewarding way to participate in their conservation and building coastal resilience. I have participated in community science projects in the past and hope to I hope to pay forward the incredible support that I have been given at UBC through similar projects in the future.

Q: Do you have a favourite research spot at UBC Library?

“Being able to connect with UBC Library’s resources online, as well as in person, allowed a research project like this to be accessible even through a very stormy winter where it was difficult to make it to the mainland by boat.”

My favorite library research place is virtual since I live quite far from campus. Being able to connect with UBC Library’s resources online, as well as in person, allowed a research project like this to be accessible even through a very stormy winter where it was difficult to make it to the mainland by boat.


New Books at the Law Library – 24/06/18

LAW LIBRARY reference room (level 2): K3230.R45 G66 2021
G.S. Goodwin-Gill & J. McAdam, The Refugee in International Law, 4th ed (Oxford University Press, 2021).

Organic Farming Industry Overview

Organic Farming Industry Overview KylaM

New Canadian Open Access Legal Citation Guide

There’s a new Canadian legal citation guide, and it’s open access! Launched in June 2024, the COAL-RJAL Guide is for everyone who cites legal materials and it incorporates feedback contributed by reviewers from Canadian courts, law firms, law journals, law societies, and law schools. The English version of the Guide is available now and the French version is coming soon. Explore the Guide on CanLII for writing, editing, or teaching, and provide your feedback. https://canlii.ca/t/7nc6q

Meet Norman L. Kwong (林佐民): A Remarkable Chinese Canadian Icon

Norman L. Kwong’s path to becoming a significant figure in Canadian sports and society as a Chinese Canadian speaks volumes about resilience and breaking barriers. In this week’s blog post, we will explore his remarkable life, including the challenges he faced and the success he achieved.

Early Life and Challenges


Norman Kwong (far right, front row) with high school classmates

Born in Calgary in 1929, Norman Kwong grew up in the Bridgeland-Riverside area, where his parents ran a grocery store. At that time, there were fewer than 5,000 Chinese Canadians in Alberta, mostly men due to the obstacles brought by the federal Head Tax, which made it challenging for families to reunite in Canada. Kwong’s mother was one of just five Chinese women in the province. In 1923, the government enacted the Chinese Immigration Act, commonly referred to as the Chinese Exclusion Act, effectively ceasing immigration from China. It wasn’t until 1947 that this legislation was repealed, finally granting Chinese Canadians the right to vote.


Certificate of payment of head tax by a Chinese immigrant named Chang Wing


Petition initiated by the Anti-Chinese Association in Victoria, 1880

Rise to Football Star


Kwong breaking through the defense for the Calgary Stampeders

Against the backdrop of prevalent racism and discrimination, Kwong found passion in football and joined the Calgary Stampeders in 1948, which was just a year after the repeal of the Chinese Exclusion Act. Not only did he become Canada’s first professional Chinese Canadian football player, but he also made history as the youngest player to win the championship in his first Grey Cup at the age of 18.


Caricature of the 1948 Western Canadian Senior Football Champions, Calgary Stampeders. Norman Kwong, known as ‘Norm,’ appears between Check Anderson and Cliff Kliewer

Several years later, Kwong joined the Edmonton Eskimos, where he made significant contributions to the team’s consecutive championship victories from 1954 to 1956. His outstanding performance during this period further solidified his reputation as one of the greatest players in Canadian Football League (CFL) history. Kwong also set 30 CFL records and was given the Schenley award for Most Outstanding Canadian two years in a row.


Photo of Edmonton Eskimos with the 1956 Grey Cup, winning it for the third consecutive year

Transition to Business and Community Leadership

After retiring from football in 1960, Kwong remained steadfast in his commitment to both the community and sports. He transitioned into roles such as president and general manager of the Calgary Stampeders and was part owner of the Calgary Flames during their Stanley Cup-winning years. In addition to his contributions to sports, Kwong was also a passionate advocate for multiculturalism and health and wellness in Alberta.

In 2005, Kwong made history again by becoming Alberta’s first Chinese Canadian lieutenant-governor, a position he held until 2010. Throughout his life, he received numerous honors and awards for his achievements, including induction into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame and the Order of Canada. Norman Kwong’s legacy continues to inspire generations of Canadians.


Norman L. Kwong delivering a speech at the 1975 Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame induction ceremony

We hope you’ve enjoyed this brief introduction to the life of Norman Kwong. All the materials shared in this blogpost can be accessed through our open collections.

Thank you for reading!

 

 

References:

O’Leary, C. (May 23. 2022). O’Leary: Norman Kwong’s legacy stands tall over Canada. Canadian Football League. https://www.cfl.ca/2022/05/23/oleary-norman-kwongs-legacy-stands-tall-over-canada/.

Redmond. G. & Snyder, L. (May 28, 2021). Norman Kwong. The Canadian Encyclopedia.https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/norman-kwong.

Schwinghamer, S. (n.d.). Before and after 1923: Chinese Exclusion in Context. Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21. https://pier21.ca/before-and-after-1923-chinese-exclusion-context.

Simons, P. (Sep 06, 2016). Paula Simons: A legend on and off the field, Norman Kwong played to win. Edmonton Journal. https://edmontonjournal.com/news/politics/paula-simons-a-legend-on-and-off-the-field-norman-kwong-played-to-win.

Wilson, D. F. (May 3, 2024). Asian heritage month: Norman Kwong. The Victoria Voice.https://thevictoriavoice.com/news/asian-heritage-month-norman-kwong.

Resources for Indigenous Entrepreneurs

Resources for Indigenous Entrepreneurs KylaM

Meet CJ McGillivray, recipient of the UBC Undergraduate Prize in Library Research

About the prize

The UBC Undergraduate Prize in Library Research is a way to showcase students’ effective and innovative use of library services, information experts and resources provided by the UBC Library. Applications for these prizes also provide students with an opportunity to reflect on their information-seeking experience, showcase their research beyond the classroom, and promote scholarship excellence at the undergraduate level at the University of British Columbia.

The Prize was established by UBC Library to encourage more and deeper use of its resources and collections, to advance information literacy at UBC, and to promote academic excellence at UBC.


Q: Could you tell us a little bit about your project?

My research project focuses on the character of Portia in William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar. My methodology was to analyze her use of rhetoric and bodily harm as they relate to the traditionally masculine principles of violence and integrity. I concluded that Portia performs the role of a man better than her husband and the other conspirators, making her a threat to conceptions of gender and identity in Ancient Rome.

Q: What does winning this prize mean to you?

“The prize allows me to worry less about the financial stresses of being a student and focus more on what I love.”

The UBC Undergraduate Prize in Library Research is a terrific funding opportunity for students, and I’m so grateful that my research project was selected. In a practical sense, the prize allows me to worry less about the financial stresses of being a student and focus more on what I love. It also validates the time, passion and effort that my classmates and I put into our research. Shout out to Diana Andrews, Kyla Terenzek and Alexei Villareal for the accomplishment. I’m excited to learn more about their projects.

Q: What are your plans for the future?

My long-term plans definitely include graduate school and working towards a career in academia as either a researcher or educator. My main research interests include early modern literature, moral philosophy and science fiction. I also want to continue dabbling in theatre. This summer I’m directing a Shakespeare cabaret with a mix of monologues and original music.

Q: Do you have a favourite research spot at UBC Library?

Anywhere with a view! I love sitting up on the fourth floor of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and looking out the windows.


New Books at the Law Library – 24/06/04

LAW LIBRARY reference room (level 2): KE1389 .M33 2023 Kevin Patrick McGuinness, Maurice Coombs, Kevin Patrick McGuinness & Maurice Coombs Canadian Business Corporations Law (Toronto: LexisNexis Canada Inc., 2023).

Collection Spotlight: June is National Indigenous History Month

June is National Indigenous History Month, a time to honour and celebrate Indigenous peoples’ diverse cultures, histories, and contributions. This month provides an opportunity to reflect on the rich heritage, resilience, and enduring traditions of Indigenous communities across the land. Join us in recognizing and appreciating the invaluable impact of Indigenous peoples on our shared history and future.

Below is a small sample of the newest books in our latest Collection Spotlight, “June is National Indigenous History Month.”

Click on the title or image to take you to the catalogue record for the item:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Books at Education Library: June 2024

Welcome to our June book roundup at UBC Education Library! We’re excited to share a fresh selection of new arrivals for readers of all ages.

Click on the title for more information:

F1234.V17 S25 2023 Jovita wore pants: the story of a Mexican freedom fighter / by Aida Salazar; art by Molly Mendoza.

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PZ7.1.O4425 Fu 2022 Funeral girl / Emma K. Ohland.

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PZ7.1.S4755 Gr 2019 Gratitude dude / Shadi Shakeraneh.

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PZ7.1.F75478 Re 2023 The reunion / a novel by Kit Frick.

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PZ7.1.H4314 We 2023 We’ll never tell / Wendy Heard.

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